Qualcomm Snapdragon X (Nuvia/Oryon architecture)

All still sounds pretty promising, now can we get one of those AMOLED SDX devices with Wacom EMR please?

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I’ve heard that its currently incompatible due to the bands of RFI the new chips, produce.

Fixable, but likely not until after the first round of devices

Side note, I’m seeing on that article about the Dell specs leak that the XPS 13 (and possible others, didn’t check yet) will have “LG 2.8k tandem pOLED”. So in addition to the “Summer if SDX” I guess it’s the summer of tandem OLEDs as well!

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I saw that as well and looking forward to seeing those panels. Allegedly they have an even better color gamut than the new iPad Pros, though at the possible cost of higher power consumption

And now MS and Qualcomm are full speed ahead on the PR/Hype front.

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Daily Geekbench dump:

Those numbers are quite impressive.

Apple will be ok regardless, but Intel has got be having a full on WTF emergency right now.

And AMD is having a we better get our a##es in gear moment and announce our new thing(s) (which is very close, and may involve a tie up with Samsung, several little birdies have told me…)

I guess Intel will still have Linux :zipper_mouth_face:

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Isn’t Intel’s embedded chip business pretty robust as well?

Yes and the attempt to be a fab for others is off to a promising start, but those are kind of the only bright spots at the moment.

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With our tax dollars.:skypewondering:

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100%. Apple will always be okay as long as they stay true to their roots and company culture which, despite all my issues with Tim Cook, he has at least kept that part of the Steve Jobs company alive. They have a vibe and user-friendly environment that will always appeal to a broad base. Even if technically and functionally M series were to fall far behind Snapdragon X, they can always fall back on having a foothold among the layman user crowd. I am hard on them for their performance shenanigans as of late, but I recommend Apple products to friends just because of the user-friendliness, quality experience, and platform integration.

Years of complacency will do that. Admittedly, they have been making the right moves with Patrick Gelsinger, who was the best choice of a CEO to pull them out of their tough situation. And if they can pull it off after being the first and only chipmaker to get the best manufacturing equipment in the world from ASML, they will be ahead of even TSMC in just 2-3 years in process node. However, right now, they are in a transitional period, probably the worst looking from a short-term insulated perspective. The poor look comes down to the 14th Gen, where they decided to go all-in on implementing their multi-chip packaging technology (something that will come in handy now and for years to come so they are not dependent on any one source for chip production) and not the logic or microarchitecture. To those not aware of the big changes that came before this year or the big changes that will be following next year, Intel looks like they are off the rails. Their products, while smart in design, functionally speaking, will come in dead last compared to Qualcomm and AMD. Qualcomm has Snapdragon X launching in only four days, and AMD will be revealing Zen 5 (what Jim Keller has revealed the numbers for already, and it is also a veritable force to be reckoned with) at Computex only a few weeks later in June and releasing it several weeks later in Q3. Intel? Their 14th Gen processors are only seeing within margin of error improvements, and these are products that draw as much as three times the power as AMD just to keep up.

That’d be TSMC, who is manufacturing and packaging their Zen 5 processors. (Samsung’s only major relationship with AMD currently is licensing their graphics IP for Exynos.) Like Snapdragon X, AMD’s new Zen 5 mobile processors will also have NPUs with 45 TOPs. The bigger reveal is they are moving to a big.LITTLE/performance-efficiency core model. The single-die 9000 series Zen 5 chips will now have 12 cores: 8 large Zen 5 cores and 4 small Zen 5c cores. What makes AMD’s big and small cores technique unique to their company is all cores (regardless of size) will have the same IPC. Larger cores are designed to be more efficient at higher frequencies and the smaller cores more efficient at lower frequencies. Instruction set and core characteristics otherwise remain extremely close, which is ideal for developers who hate the latency differences of heterogeneous designs. (AMD already did a warm-up match or dress rehearsal of this with Zen 4c. Ryzen Z1 and Ryzen 5 7545U is a low-volume test run of this new approach to big and small core design. With this technique, they can now double the core count, with the same IPC, within only a 10% larger total die area.)

If they’re lucky, that is. True, they’ve made Clear Linux which, from a kernel architect’s perspective, is a masterclass in OS design thanks to its record-breaking efficiency of Linux’s already extremely efficient, close-to-the-metal processing. And Intel is constantly contributing more than possibly any other chipmaker to the Linux kernel and libraries thanks to their army of tens of thousands of software engineers.

But both AMD (thanks to the Steam Deck’s extremely avid userbase, Valve and AMD moved the needle on Linux’s multimedia feature set the most in decades, bringing native HDR and vastly improved video decoding support) and now Qualcomm (shots already fired here) aren’t exactly ignoring Linux either. This year is going to be a rough patch for chipzilla. Even so, they just received order of ASML’s best manufacturing equipment that will be their superweapon against TSMC and Samsung’s chip manufacturing, and they have a new microarchitecture coming first thing next year, so they will be coming back with a vengeance. In the meantime, this will be their worst year in terms of optics since the doldrums of the Pentium 4, I would wager.

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I have no clue how those numbers for geekbench work. I haven’t ever paid attention to benchmark scores in the past, but then again, my needs are usually more RAM intensive than CPU intensive. But, Samsung is definitely the manufacturer I’m watching to see if I may want to upgrade from my MacBook Pro. I’m not sold on a 360 clamshell vs true tablet/detachable slate, but if my MacBook burns out this year, I’m not going to be all that picky. Honestly, for my full PC, development will take precedence over creativity, so even RAM isn’t all that important. I just want good battery life.

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Reading all these articles and all the benchmark hype, am I the only person who finds that Micrsoft’s supposed triumphant M1 moment is NOT being live streamed? Smells of either EXTREME FEAR of a botched demo or EXTREME FEAR of presentation failure - either of which could be fatal, OR

Just simple old issue of reruns of device designs that won’t spark any techno lust and only us geeks will salivate over for the numbers.

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Well, to be fair, Apple’s livestream event isn’t live either but is a scheduled prerecorded highly edited presentation. It does make you wonder if there is just an uneasiness to hold a real live event among tech companies in general, or if there is a problem afoot in Redmond on the software side of the equation. They are holding the live event with the press so they will be at least be held up to some degree of scrutiny by the media. At least Surface Pro 10 will be exciting with OLED, Snapdragon X Elite, and a big 45-50 WHr battery. The tech channel’s live blogs are sure to keep us all on our toes and on the edge of our seats!

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Or maybe MS management is just boring

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You apparently missed the point that I was alluding to a rumored bigger partnership. One that has not been announced yet, but that will contain higher end RADEON graphics cores combined with “EXYNOS+” performance and efficiency cores (current rumored codename) and offered by both AMD and Samsung

This allegedly has been under development for awhile now, but hit some unanticipated roadblocks, that have apparently been solved.

Latest time frame is fall winter 2024 for an announcement and shipping product early 2025, in time for MWC

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True. But it seems Jobs and Musk types are generational phenomena.

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That is true, and while I don’t think Panay is in that rarified space, he was good (if cheesy) in his presentations, especially his sincere love for his work and products - far better than the back benchers, including Nadella, now carrying the ball. Hopefully we’ll learn why he REALLY left MS.

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It seems fitting that the Snapdragon X logo is like the Yin and Yang symbol, with the dark side getting its black tentacles over to the white side. :yum:

image

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Developer kits are already up for preorder for $899, so if you were hankering for a Snapdragon X Elite-based Mac Mini, this is it. Specs include a special developer edition 80-watt SKU (X1E-00-1DE) Snapdragon X Elite that boosts to 4.3 GHz, 32GB RAM, user-replaceable 512GB SSD of unspecified length, WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.4, and a generous I/O of 3 USB 4.0 Type-C, 2 USB 3.0 Type-A, a 3.5mm audio jack, HDMI port, and ethernet port. When you sign up, you are put into a preorder queue where you will eventually receive the option to purchase closer to the release date on June 18th.

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