Qualcomm Snapdragon X (Nuvia/Oryon architecture)

To my great shame I haven’t kept up with this thread. What’s the earliest that we might see Snapdragon X devices in the hands of consumers? Are we talking… weeks? Days?

Some were the standard version at up to 3.4ghz, while others were the binned version at up to 3.8ghz.

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June I think.

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June for the consumer version of Surface Pro 10 and shortly followed by the rest of Qualcomm’s partners in July in advance of the back-to-school shopping season.

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where did you see this info?

When the Surface update was announced.

Principally Windows Central (regarding Surface Pro 10’s release), as well as other numerous sources (Laptop Mag, Tech Radar, etc.) regarding the target release of other partner products.

Watch the first segment of Windows Weakly for a very positive pre-review of the Snapdragon Elite where his hands-on time left him with good impressions of where WOA is headed, especially his impression of the NPU…

And check out his “hands on” report for x64 gaming emulation

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Does this mean that the Snapdragon X Plus processor in the Surface Pro 10 (ARM) will be approximately an M1 processor…

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Yeah I saw that article and my main grumpy thought was “Oh look, maybe MS did find a way to screw up this next release.” I didn’t have the energy to look up how these SoCs (Elite vs “plus”) are supposed to differ. Anyone?

Going by the link they give, I assume the Plus is lower performance/cheaper.

The article indicates the high end processor (Elite) will show up in the Surface Laptop 6, with the Plus slated for the Surface Pro 10. I would guess it’s a thermals/throttling game with this first release. Hard to swallow that headline though that it is going to the “lower-end Windows 11 on ARM PC” when they are talking about a Surface Pro.

Or it could be that they’ll have both varieties for the Surface 10 Pro just as they had both i5 and i7 Intel varieties in the past. Different SKUs for different customers / price points.

Are they going to try to make the Pro 10 Surface ARM fanless?

Based on what we’ve heard from other OEMs Qualcomm might have missed their thermal versus performance targets for devices like a pro at least for version 1.x

The strategy is not unlike Apple’s where the pro and max M chips are reserved for the Macbook Pros versus the Air.

That’s not completely an about face if true as the original surface pros were not pitched as ultimate performance devices, but more as powerful considering their form factor.

Plus multiple sources have said that MS wants to get back to thin and fanless for the Surface pro line as the orginal pro X was.

That being said, even the so called plus chips still will significantly out perform the current SQ2 and should be competitive with the core i chips in the business 10s while bring the benefits of better battery life, truly instant on, 5g and the superior NPU compared to Intel 14th gen.

PS. Can’t go in to details due to NDA, but MS recently acquired a startup that was developing a “revolutionary cooling solution for ultra portables”. It’s believed that the acquisition was primarily for the rumored Xbox handheld, but the surface line should benefit as well.

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You really should have been a lawyer. :vb_agree:

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Good to know. My concern goes back to the SQ1 days where the …processor performance should be similar to a Intel Core i5 8th gen U-series (e.g. i5-8250U) according to Qualcomm… So far it looks like this is not a concern, but the appearance of the “Plus” sub-designation is still a question…

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If this site is to be believed, the Plus model doesn’t look all that much slower than the Elite version, right?

Screencap from the article, more info in the link.

Agreed and from pratical standpoint Windows and almost all 3rd party apps still don’t make effective use of more that at most 4 cores, the real world performance feel of these chips is going to be very close.

Plus, ( see what I did there :slight_smile: ) users will get the benefit of an even more power efficient chip and/or one that’s well suited to a fanless design.

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Just to add some perspective and clarification, the current intel I am operating on is the Surface Pro 10 consumer model will have the Elite and Plus models of the Snapdragon X series. Think of it like the Surface Pro with the current arrangement of the Core i5 and Core i7 segmentation and apply the same line of reasoning with the Plus and Elite tiers of Snapdragon X and you are right on the money. You will notice that Windows Central whose information likely stems from similar sources as myself also firmly confirms Snapdragon X Elite will be in the Surface Pro 10 consumer model (links: EXCLUSIVE: Microsoft will unveil OLED Surface Pro 10 and Arm Surface Laptop 6 this spring ahead of major Windows 11 AI update | Windows Central; Microsoft unveils business-focused Surface Pro 10 and Surface Laptop 6 with Intel Core Ultra, new NPUs, and display upgrades | Windows Central).

There is no power limitation preventing the use of the Snapdragon X Elite in a passively cooled fanless device. The maximum power draw they quote for the Qualcomm thin and light reference model is 23 watts under a full synthetic load of both CPU and GPU, including the entire system (including the display at a peak 100% brightness, which accounts for 5-10 watts itself, as well as 100% volume for the speakers, and full write activity for the onboard NVMe, typically 3-5 watts, and so on). Per AnandTech, “[a]ctive cooling will be needed to get the most out of the Elite, but according to Qualcomm, passive/fanless designs are possible as well, and we should expect to see some retail devices designed as such.”

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