Bluetooth device auto-connect, can it be managed?

I’ve always found it maddening that whenever a Windows laptop is woken, it auto connects to Bluetooth speakers, often causing the iOS or Android phone that was playing something at the time to pause, or add phantom issues to the connection.

Other than unpairing the speaker, I can’t see a way to prevent this happening, although years ago I bought my mum a Ruark R1 radio which allowed Bluetooth device connections to be managed easily on the speaker. (our current one isn’t that fancy).

Does anyone know of any Bluetooth device manager software out there that replaces the Windows default and allows for proper connection selection and control?

I assume this bugs plenty of knowledgeable folk and developers too!

Cheers for any advice,
Rupert.

PS. I’m using Win 10 Pro (on an HP ZBook X2)

You don’t have the proper consumerist mindset.

Of course, the expectation is that one will have a dedicated set of Bluetooth speakers for each device with Bluetooth.

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Ha, how silly of me not to realise that - must go out and buy a pair of bluetooth headphones and a speaker for every PC and phone in the household immediately to mitigate shoddy software design!

Thanks for showing me the ‘light’ @WillAdams!

On a serious note, yes, this is an annoying issue, and one which should be addressed (and an example of why I prefer wired/powered things).

BTW, this is not unique to Windows. My wife’s IPhone and My Note 10 fight for control of our BT speakers all the time.

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My iStuff always wins the fights for BT headphone possession, being faster at the draw than my Windows or Android stuff. I often have to turn off BT on my iPhone temporarily to free the headphones for laptop connection when playing Windows games. What can you do? :person_shrugging:

You can use the headphone jack instead! Which my Lenovo laptop still retains and my Bose Q35 II headphones come with the wiring so I can go BT or wired, my choice.

Spoiler: they sound better wired. :+1:

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Have you tried posting it on the Feedback Hub? Microsoft will definitely get on it in a timely fashion and not completely ignore it…

The closest I could find is this (and it works):

Funny, my Note 10 beats her IPhone 12 all the time.

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I’ve never had a Samsung phone and an iPhone at the same time. Sounds like Samsung is doing things well, as one would expect from them on their premium devices. :+1:

Funnily enough, I hadn’t bothered to ask MS support Tams!
I did see a few failed attempts by others which reminded me why…

Perhaps I’ll hold my nose and try, as I expected there to be an alternative utility, but there doesn’t seem to be one.
Cheers for looking tho.

Noticed your footer by the way - I miss my N900 - used the FM transmitter all the time, even used the IR at times.

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We’ve got two iPhones here (I’m trying it through gritted teeth as the privacy focus appeals) and they both connect to the speaker, but then interfere with each other so the sound glitches constantly!

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Ah, the FM transmitter. Good and fun memories there! I still miss it, though it was never any good here in Japan as FM radio here only goes up to the very lower frequencies that are used in the UK, as here they are quite full already.

And the N900. Such a wonderful device. Didn’t get me into programming though.

As for MS support… the state of it. The only time they’ve actually helped is when I asked them on Twitter. It seems that every big company ends up becoming detached from their users.

Yikes, that’s a nasty problem. I’ve never had two active iPhones at once so never run across that issue. iPhone and iPad have never interfered with each other on any BT accessory so I’m wondering if it’s a matter of BT implementation on the speaker side. Edit: or maybe because I never have two iThingies connected to speakers or headphone and playing something at the same time. I mean, I’m just one person so I don’t play multiple audio feeds at once.